Chondroitin sulfate superior to celecoxib for knee cartilage loss

In patients with knee osteoarthritis, quantitative MRI found chondroitin sulfate was superior to celecoxib in the reduction of cartilage volume loss, according to results of a 2-year exploratory study.

“In sum, this study confirmed that chondroitin sulfate is equally efficient as an anti inflammatory drug for the treatment of OA symptoms, with the added advantage of its better safety profile and joint protection effect”, concluded Dr. Pelletier. Spanish National Congress of Rheumatology hosted in Seville

“In sum, this study confirmed that chondroitin sulfate is equally efficient as an anti inflammatory drug for the treatment of OA symptoms, with the added advantage of its better safety profile and joint protection effect,” concluded Dr. Pelletier. Spanish National Congress of Rheumatology hosted in Seville May 21, 2015

by Will Offit, Healio Rheumatology November 8, 2016

Pelletier and colleagues performed quantitative MRI (qMRI) at baseline, 12 months and 24 months to evaluate bone marrow lesion size and synovial thickness in patients with knee OA. Afterward, the researchers performed analyses of modified intention-to-treat (mITT) (n = 138) and according-to-protocol (ATP) (n = 120) populations. The primary endpoint was the qMRI cartilage volume loss (CVS) in the lateral compartment due to 1,200 mg of daily chondroitin sulfate (CS) compared with 200 mg of daily celecoxib. The secondary endpoints were the assessment of OA structural changes, as well as signs and symptoms of OA.

In the mITT analysis, patients treated with CS after 24 months — compared with patients treated with celecoxib — had significantly reduced CVS in the medial compartment (–8.1% vs. –6.3%) and in the medial condyle (–7.7% vs. –5.5%), but not in the lateral compartment. In the ATP analysis, they found patients treated with CS had significantly reduced CVS in the medial compartment at 12 months (–5.6% vs. –4.5%) and at 24 months (–8.4% vs. –6.6%), as well as in the medial condyle at 24 months (–8.1% vs. –5.7%).

In patients with CS, the researchers observed an upward trend toward reduced synovial thickness in the medial suprapatellar bursa. They also observed a reduced incidence of joint swelling, effusion and overall symptoms with time in both groups. Further, both groups showed good safety profiles including cardiovascular events.

Source Healio Rheumatology

Chondroitin sulfate efficacy versus celecoxib on knee osteoarthritis structural changes using magnetic resonance imaging: a 2-year multicentre exploratory study, Jean-Pierre Pelletier, Jean-Pierre Raynauld, André D. Beaulieu, Louis Bessette, Frédéric Morin, Artur J. de Brum-Fernandes, Philippe Delorme, Marc Dorais, Patrice Paiement, François Abram and Johanne Martel-Pelletier. Arthritis Research & Therapy 201618:256 DOI: 10.1186/s13075-016-1149-0 Published 3 November 2016

PANLAR Consensus Recommendations for the Management in Osteoarthritis of Hand, Hip, and Knee, Rillo O, Riera H, Acosta C, Liendo V, Bolaños J, Monterola L, Nieto E, Arape R, Franco LM, Vera M, Papasidero S, Espinosa R, Esquivel JA, Souto R, Rossi C, Molina JF, Salas J, Ballesteros F, Radrigan F, Guibert M, Reyes G, Chico A, Camacho W, Urioste L, Garcia A, Iraheta I, Gutierrez CE, Aragón R, Duarte M, Gonzalez M, Castañeda O, Angulo J, Coimbra I, Munoz-Louis R, Saenz R, Vallejo C, Briceño J, Acuña RP, De León A, Reginato AM, Möller I, Caballero CV, Quintero M. J Clin Rheumatol. 2016 Oct;22(7):345-54. doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000000449.

Also see
MRI imaging techniques confirm that Chondroitin Sulfate delays the advance of knee osteoarthritis in Bioiberica

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